North Shore Scuba

We’ve Got The Scoop On Scuba

Here at North Shore Explorers the ocean is unfamiliar territory for most of our customers. A lot of people come to us wanting to better explore the world that lies beneath the surface. To this we are quick to recommend scuba diving – a relaxing activity that is sure to make your underwater dreams a reality. All you need is a little bit of training to get started. Below are a few simple steps to take before you can get your scuba on.

Step 1: Determine whether you meet the physical prerequisites.

With ongoing modern improvements to medicine, training and dive equipment, scuba diving has become possible for people of all ages and sizes. Those with a basic level of physical fitness and who are comfortable in the water make prime candidates. Of course, there are a small amount of specific medical conditions that make scuba diving off limits, we recommend you see your physician if you are unsure as to whether you fit in this category or not.

Step 2: Get your gear.

Diving is made possible with scuba equipment. All scuba divers will need a set of properly fitting and well-maintained gear before taking on the deep blue. Most scuba packages are sold complete with both scuba gear and a beginner’s course – which leads us to Step 3.

Step 3: Choose a course that is right for you.

While diving naturally comes with some risks (like any sport, really), said risks can be left at a minimum when divers have learned how to properly use their gear and follow safety guidelines. Here at North Shore Explorers we provide an efficient dive theory lesson, followed by an explanation on how to use your equipment before heading out to an introductory level dive with a professional instructor. Once you master the skills we’ve taught, you will be introduced to all that North Shore’s underwater paradise has to offer.

Step 4: Ask questions.

There is no such thing as a “stupid” question when it comes to scuba diving. During and after your introductory dive you will have questions like “how do I prevent my mask from fogging?”, “how deep can I dive?”, “why does diving make me need to pee?”. These are all valid questions that we’ll be happy to answer. The more you know and the better prepared you are, the greater your diving experience will be.

Give our adventure center a call to book a scuba diving excursion. We can’t wait for you to see what Hawaii’s underwater paradise has to offer – you won’t believe your eyes!

DUKE KAHANAMOKU: SURFER OF THE CENTURY

Despite its overwhelming popularity, surfing – a sport native to the Hawaiian Islands – is relatively new to America (and the rest of the world). What kind of ocean enthusiasts would we be if we didn’t take some time to recognize, praise and thank the man that brought the sport of surfing alive.

Duke Kahanamoku – Hawaii’s first “Ambassador of Aloha”, “the human fish”, five-time Olympic medalist, etc. – was the first native Hawaiian to bring he`enalu (surfing) to the United States mainland. Duke was born in 1890 in Honolulu to low-ranking nobles who were in service to the monarchy. His family moved to Kalia, Waikiki when Duke was three and his obsession with the water blossomed. At the tender age of twenty-two Kahanamoku, the once naked kid who would swim through shark infested waters at the Honolulu Harbor in search of silver coins, earned a spot on his first American Olympic Swimming team – the only native Hawaiian present.

Called “The Duke” by mainland sportswriters, Kahanamoku used his athletic notoriety to bring to light the ancient art of surfing – a sport almost unheard of outside of the islands – to mainland American culture. As Duke explains in his autobiography, surfing leaves “you rewarded with a feeling of complete freedom and independence while rocketing across the face of a wave”. Kahanamoku provided surfing demonstrations, with the help of his 16-foot koa wood board sin fins, to both mainland coasts in hopes to bring popularity to the art. He never attained his goal of surfing as an Olympic event, however, by the 60’s surfing had become an important part of everyday American life – popularized by films like “Beach Blanket Bingo”, “Gidget” and the music group The Beach Boys.

Though never consumed by his fortune or fame, Duke was a natural born business man and began lending his name for a generous profit to both Hawaiian and American surfing teams, competitions and gear. Surfer magazine pronounced him as the “Surfer of the Century”.

Duke passed from a heart attack in 1968 and was mourned as the swimming and surfing champion of two cultures. It has been said that the native Hawaiians viewed Mr. Kahanamoku as a fulfilled prophecy once declared by King Kamehameha that “before the native Hawaiian race died out, one man would bring it fame.”

From all those that enjoy the island life and the surfing culture, let us say Mahalo Duke for blessing so many people with your many talents.

If you’d like to surf some of the same waves that Duke enjoyed contact us for an unforgettable experience.

Top Five Waterfalls On Oahu

 

Rainy days in Hawaii Nei, though they be but scarce, sprout beautiful rainbows and revive the island’s waterfalls. The next time it rains and pours, take a trip off-road into the rainforest terrain for adventure to these top five waterfalls.

WAIMEA FALLS

Located at the end of a paved trail, Waimea Falls is a 45-ft waterfall and 100% worth the park admission fee. With a changing room, life vests available, and a life guard on duty, you can feel free to bring the keiki for a refreshing dip in the freshwater pools.

JACKASS GINGER POOLS

The 1-mile loop off Nu’uanu’s Judd trail brings you to several 10-ft falls that cascade into a beautiful freshwater pool. With a rope swing already on site it’s perfect for a day full of relaxation and fun.

MAUNAWILI FALLS

A relatively easy hike along Maunawili stream through coffee, kukui nut, and monkey pod trees bring you to a deep swimming pool with various height boulders ranging from 10-ft to 60-ft to jump from. Partially paved, the hike offers exceptional views of the picturesque landscape.

MANOA FALLS

Nestled in the mountainside close to Waikiki, the popular landmark is a 1.6-mile hike on a very well taken care path. The 150-ft falls are truly a sight to behold, complemented by the scenery. The only con to these falls is the crowd. You will have to use some creative angles to keep your Instagram posts “stranger-free”.

LAIE FALLS

For those with ample time on their hands, head to the north shore and take a 7-mile hike through bamboo, guava, and pine to a quiet 15-ft waterfall pouring into a serene pool. Though this hike is long and requires a permit, it is well worth it and not crowded.

Hawaii is home to endless amounts of adventure and fun for the whole family. Rainy days and waterfalls are just two of the many gifts that the islands keep on giving. Book a snorkeling lesson, Segway tour, surfboard rental, bike session, or even a Lunar Legends Lagoon Tour right here on the website! You name it, we’ve got it. Here at North Shore Explorers we are firm believers in letting Hawaii happen.

North Shore Explorers

North Shore Beach Guide: The Top 6 North Shore Beaches to Check Out on Oahu

The North Shore of Oahu is home to some of the most beautiful beaches in the world. In a recent survey conducted by The Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau, about three and a half million visitors make their way to the North Shore at some point in their stay. Below is a list of our favorite beaches on the north side, we hope you have the chance to check them out!

Ali`i Beach Park has some of the best surfing waves on the North Shore and was dubbed “Ali’I Beach” in the early 1900’s. It’s surf break hovers over a shallow reef which provides clean, yet dangerous, conditions. There is a lifeguard on duty and public restrooms, which welcomes lots of families throughout the year.

Haleʻiwa Beach Park is definitely family-friendly. With a nice area to picnic and play, and a space to wade in the water, Hale`iwa Beach Park is long, safe and sandy. It sits close enough to Ali`i Beach to see seasoned surfers and big waves without binoculars and a nasty current.

Laniakea Beach, otherwise known as Turtle Beach, is a popular stopping place for tourists. There are no parking stalls designated for this beach, however most visitors park along the adjacent highway. If traveling with children, beware of the oncoming traffic. In recent years, the everyday crowd has grown, most often to see a glimpse of the handful of turtles that visit the beach daily.

Waimea Bay Beach Park is the most popular of North Shore breaks. During the winter the waves can reach thirty feet. If visiting the beach park during one of these swells, be sure to stay clear of the water, but take the time to enjoy the breathtaking, awe-inspiring site. Though there is a parking lot at Waimea, it is almost always full, be prepared to walk a little bit before setting up your beach gear.

Banzai, Pipeline is located directly across from Sunset Beach Elementary School. “Pipe”, as the locals call it, is the longest continuous stretch of wide beach on Oahu and is home to some of the best surfing in the world. Parking is limited and lifeguards are on site.

Sunset Beach, known for its beautiful Hawaiian sunsets, may be the most famous of the North Shore beaches. Pack some water, food and sunscreen and plan to stay for a while – you won’t regret it.

If you aren’t already in Hawai`i, we hope that you plan the time to pay us a visit. We may be a little biased here at North Shore Explorers, but we’re pretty sure the North Shore holds the most beautiful beaches on O`ahu. Whether you live on the island and need a little help navigating your way around or are coming in from the mainland and need a lot of help planning a vacation, give us a call! Let us help you explore, it’s what we do!

Aloha,

The North Shore Explorer Team

Oahu Biking

Hawaii Business Magazine: Pedal Power

We were recently featured in Hawaii Business Magazine’s article entitled Pedal Power.  In summary, the article talks about the fact that there are more bicyclists on Oahu roads then ever before.  The article further discusses the biking options now available on Oahu and how the demand for biking has helped to grow many local businesses.  An excerpt of the article is below:

Thirty-four miles away, in Kahuku, Brett Lee has had similar success. Lee is the owner of Hele Huli Adventure Center at the Turtle Bay Resort. The one-stop center offers bike, moped, Segway and snorkel rentals as well as guided tours.

“Bike rentals have rocketed up to the No. 2 spot in overall revenue for my company,” says Lee, who started Hele Huli in 2009. He estimates that 500 to 600 people, most of them hotel guests, rent bikes from the center each month.

To meet demand, the resort opened a 3-mile mountain-bike trail in 2015, and plans to add three more miles. “There exists 12 miles of multi-purpose trails already, but it’s much more appealing to people when there’s a specific trail system for bikes only,” says Lee, adding that the center has also hosted racing events for kamaaina.

Lee says he also gets visitors, nearly daily, who rent his bikes to ride off-campus for lunch at one of Kahuku’s famous shrimp trucks, or to visit the North Shore’s renowned surf breaks. “Bikes allow them to make that trek and explore (the North Shore) in more intimate fashion,” he says. “Unlike in a car, you can take in all the sounds, smells. Your senses are more stimulated.”

To read the full article, please click on the following link:  http://www.hawaiibusiness.com/pedal-power/

Aloha,

North Shore Explorers

Honu Festival 2017

Aloha all MTB/Cycling Enthusiasts,

The North Shore Bike Park, in partnership with Turtle Bay Resort, Outta Bounds Hawaii and Island Triathlon & Bike, presents the rebirth of the “Honu Festival”. On January 22, 2017 this cycling event will feature several types of races, a cyclo-cross race in the morning followed by a kids’ mountain bike trail race in the afternoon with the adults to follow. Also new this year is our E-bike trail race to close the event. Classes/division will be dependent upon the number of registered racers. We are also allowing mountain bikes to enter in the cyclo-cross event and vice versa.

So, if you are down for a day of riding, this is your chance to try 2 different disciplines in one day. For those who are not planning to race, you will still be able to ride the trails during the rest breaks between events. There will be a limited supply of bikes available for rent for those that have friends or family that want to experience the bike park trails or simply ride along the beautiful beach coast. Most of all, this will be a day of riding and or relaxing at the North Shore Bike Park and Turtle Bay Resort.

For those interested in enjoying a little R&R staycation on the weekend of the event, Turtle Bay Resort is offering Kama’aina rates starting at $199.

When: Sunday, January 22, 2017

Where: Turtle Bay Resort (North Shore Bike Park),

Parking: Take the immediate left after the security booth and follow event signage

Important Times:

  • Cyclo-Cross registration: 8:00-8:45am, Race starts promptly at 9:00am
  • Kids MTB trail race registration: 9:30-10:45am, race starts promptly at 11:00am
  • Adult MTB trail race registration: 9:30-10:45am, following the kids’ race, approx. 1:00pm
  • E-Bike trail race registration: 11:00-1:00pm, following the MTB race, approx. 2:30pm
  • Clean up 4:00pm

Race Format:

  • Cross: 1 lap on Kawela side then cross to Marconi side 4 laps
  • Kid’s: Time Trial (1 rider off every minute) one Loop of the Magic Bus trail
  • Mountain Bike: Using all three trials Banyan, Kawela, and Magic (45 minutes plus one lap)
  • E-Bike: Using all three trials Banyan, Kawela, and Magic (45 minutes plus one lap)

Cost: $10/single race or $5 each race for multiple race participant

 

Mahalo,

North Shore Bike Park

Welcome to North Shore Explorers

We are excited for the launch of our brand new website. Here you will find information about the rentals, tours and lessons that we offer at all of our locations. We will also be updating our guests on special offers and giving you ideas to make your next adventure one to remember.

We appreciate your business and look forward to meeting and exploring with you on your visit with us. Just give us a call or send us an email to book your complete Hawaiian experience with us. We can’t wait to hear from you!

(808)293-6024
info@northshoreexplorers.com